Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes


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  • February 16, 2021


Asian Tiger Mosquito

Adults of this mosquito have black bodies with conspicuous white stripes. A distinctive single white stripe runs the length of the back. Body length is approximately 0.5 centimeters. Distinct silver-white bands are evident on the palpus and tarsi. Eggs are approximately 0.1 centimeters in length and dark brown to black. Eggs are laid in moist areas just above the water surface and are capable of overwintering. Eggs hatch upon inundation and immature stages (larvae and pupae) of the life cycle occur in water. Larvae are filter feeders and occur in standing water found in discarded tires, small containers, and tree holes. Pupae are comma-shaped and dark brown in color.

Credit: https://cisr.ucr.edu/invasive-species/asian-tiger-mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito Image

Southern House Mosquito

Adult Culex quinquefasciatus vary from 3.96 to 4.25 mm in length (Lima et al. 2003). The mosquito is brown with the proboscis, thorax, wings, and tarsi darker than the rest of the body. The head is light brown with the lightest portion in the center. The antennae and the proboscis are about the same length, but in some cases, the antennae are slightly shorter than the proboscis. The flagellum has thirteen segments that have few to no scales (Sirivanakarn et al. 1987). The scales of the thorax are narrow and curved. The abdomen has pale, narrow, rounded bands on the basal side of each tergite. The bands barely touch the basolateral spots taking on a half-moon shape (Darsie and Ward 2005).

Southern House mosquitoes are known to carry encephalitis and West Nile Virus.

Credit: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/aquatic/southern_house_mosquito.htm

Southern House Mosquito Image

Tree Hole Mosquito

Aedes triseriatus (Ochlerotatus triseriatus) are found in the eastern half of the US and southern Canada. Ae. triseriatus normally lays its eggs in pools of water accumulated in tree holes, but it will also lay eggs in man-made water-holding containers, particularly discarded tires. They reproduce most frequently in natural or suburban forested areas. Ae. triseriatus overwinter as eggs located in dry nesting sites that become flooded in spring. Adults typically live two to five weeks. They are generally found in woodland/forested environments, including in suburban areas, and are infrequent in open areas. Ae. triseriatus normally lays its eggs in pools of water accumulated in tree holes, but it will also lay eggs in man-made water holding containers, particularly discarded tires. The breeding cycle (egg, larvae, pupae, adult) occurs over multiple seasons as Ae. triseriatus overwinter as eggs located in dry nesting sites that become flooded in spring. They have dark, unbanded legs, a black band in the middle of the thorax surrounded by silver/white on the side, black proboscis, and a black abdomen with silver scales laterally. Primarily mammalophilic, Ae. triseriatus most often feed on rodents but will also take a blood meal from humans. Feeding activity is largely crepuscular. Ae. triseriatus are the primary vector of La Crosse virus throughout their range but also transmit numerous other viral ailments.

Credit: https://www.neha.org/vector/eastern-tree-hole-mosquito

Tree Hole Mosquito Image

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